good:

Kickstarter Beats Out the Government in Funding the Arts- Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Art and Kickstarter
Since its inception, crowd-funding site Kickstarter has funded more than $600 million in arts projects, and $323.6 million in 2012 alone. The National Endowment for the Arts only has an annual budget of $146 million, of which only 80 percent are grants. Individual donors have long been the backbone of the art world (arts nonprofits spent $60 billion last year), the disparity in collective action supporting the arts on Kickstarter versus the government is cause for concern—and reflection.
Continue to washingtonpost.com
Image via Kickstarter Tumblr

good:

Kickstarter Beats Out the Government in Funding the Arts
Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Art and Kickstarter

Since its inception, crowd-funding site Kickstarter has funded more than $600 million in arts projects, and $323.6 million in 2012 alone. The National Endowment for the Arts only has an annual budget of $146 million, of which only 80 percent are grants. Individual donors have long been the backbone of the art world (arts nonprofits spent $60 billion last year), the disparity in collective action supporting the arts on Kickstarter versus the government is cause for concern—and reflection.

Continue to washingtonpost.com

Image via Kickstarter Tumblr

(via mattjamesrogs)

smartercities:

Designing Streets for People, Not Just Cars | Good
In San Francisco, three pedestrians are hit by vehicles every day. Our streets should be designed to be safer than this, and we think in the process they can also become viable public spaces that enrich our urban experience. In this project for Walk San Francisco, inspired by a GOOD Design challenge from Center for Architecture and Design, we wanted to transform everyday infrastructure to achieve both of these goals.

smartercities:

Designing Streets for People, Not Just Cars | Good

In San Francisco, three pedestrians are hit by vehicles every day. Our streets should be designed to be safer than this, and we think in the process they can also become viable public spaces that enrich our urban experience. In this project for Walk San Francisco, inspired by a GOOD Design challenge from Center for Architecture and Design, we wanted to transform everyday infrastructure to achieve both of these goals.

(via mattjamesrogs)